The Permits

Development permit – is a document issued by a Development Authority that authorises the construction of a development, and includes the plans and applicable conditions of approval. The approval process guides ‘what’ goes ‘where’ on a property. A number of things don’t require a permit but must still meet Land Use Bylaw requirements for things such as setbacks from property lines, height restrictions, visibility, site coverage, and even what kind of development can take place on the property.

Types of Development Permits What Type of Development Requires this Permit?
   
Residential Development Permit
  • Construction of anything requiring a waiver, or anything over your head (ex: garage, house, pergola, covered deck, etc.)
Commercial / Industrial / Public & Institutional Development Permit
  • Change of Use / intensity
  • Anything requiring a waiver
  • All new buildings, new accessory uses (anything with a roof)
Sign Development Permit
  • All Signs
  • All Portable Sign Renewals
Home Occupation Development Permit
  • All Home Occupations
Demolition Development Permit
  • All demolitions

Driveway Development Permit

  • To widen, create, or remove a driveway

 

Required with the development permit, you will always need to attach a site plan. Showing on the site plan you should include:

  • Name and Address
  • north arrow
  • lot dimensions and area
  • proposed and existing access
  • location and dimensions of off-street parking
  • any drainage course and water bodies
  • proposed and existing fencing and landscaping
  • any easements and utility right-of-ways
  • setbacks from property lines to all buildings existing and proposed
  • setbacks from primary building to proposed building
  • decks, hot tubs, gazebos, etc.

Note: picture below is an example of a site plan.

Example of a site plan

Building Permit - A building permit is a document issued by the Safety Codes Officer (Building Inspector) that authorises construction. Building inspection is a legal requirement of the Safety Codes Act, ensuring that the construction meets the requirements of the Alberta Building Code and is as per the specifications outlined in the Building Permit Application.

With building permits, please submit appropriate design plans and specifications for your build. Also be sure to fill out the energy code forms to go with the building permit. There are two energy code compliance forms, one for residential energy code compliance following section 9.36 of the Alberta Building Code and a non- residential energy code compliance form that follows the National Energy Code.

 

The Fees

Development Permit fees – Are all listed in the Taber Fee Bylaw

Building Permit Fees - Fees are as follows.

Building or replacing a fence?

Important Terms

Fence: a structure which may be used to prevent or restrict passage, to provide visual screening, sound attenuation, yard decor, protection from dust or the elements, or to mark a boundary.

Site triangle: The triangle formed by a straight line drawn between two points, one located along a front lot line and the second along a side lot line at a distance of 6.0 meters (20 feet) from the point where the lot lines intersect.site triangle

Before You Start

Fences on residential property are the responsibility of the property owner. Fences located on a shared property line are the responsibility of both property owners. Any cost for construction or maintenance of the fence is a private issue between neighbours. Fences and retaining walls must be located on or within the property boundaries and the Land Use Bylaw rules.

Permits to Apply For

As long as the fence is under 6.0 feet in height, and remains on or inside the property line – you do not require any permits. If the fence is over the 6.0 feet in height, a development permit must be submitted.

Building a new decks or patio?

Important Terms

Accessory Use: any use, building or structure that is subordinate or incidental to the principal building or use and is located on the same site as the principal building or use and includes, but is not limited to, garages, swimming pools, sheds, decks, and fences.

Deck: an unenclosed amenity area or platform made of concrete, brick, wood or other material that may be attached to a dwelling and is intended for the purpose of outdoor dining, lounging and other similar accessory residential use.

Patio: an uncovered horizontal structure with a surface height, at any point, no greater than 0.60 meters above grade, intended for use as an outdoor amenity space.

Porch: an unenclosed, covered structure forming an entry to a building.

Before You Start

If you are building a pergola or roof structure that is attached to your house, this is considered an addition. This includes the attachment of any covered structure to the primary residential building, such as an accessory building, covered deck or porch and requires permitting as such.

If you are building any sort of roof structure that is detached from the house, this is considered an accessory use. This requires permitting as well.

Permits to Apply For

Decks under 0.61 meters (2 feet) do not require permits.

Decks under 10 square meters (107.6 square feet) do not require permits.

If a deck is above one or the other minimum size restriction, building permit and development permits need to be applied for.

If you build a deck that will be covered, or a pergola, both a development permit and building permit are required.

Other forms to help you get your building permit for your deck are the Deck Cheat Sheet

Building or moving on an accessory building?

Important Terms

Accessory Use: any use, building or structure that is subordinate or incidental to the principal building or use and is located on the same site as the principal building or use and includes, but is not limited to, garages, swimming pools, sheds, decks, and fences.

Backyard suite:

  1. Is attached to the principal residential dwelling and may be located separate from or in conjunction with a garage;
  2. Contains two or more rooms use or designated to be used as a residence by one or more persons;
  3. Contains a kitchen, living, sleeping and sanitary facilities;
  4. Is self-contained and located within a dwelling unit;
  5. Is located on the same parcel as the main residential dwelling unit;
  6. Requires a minimum of 1.0 motor vehicle parking stalls.

Before You Start

If your structure will be connected to a house in any way, the structure is considered an addition. This includes the attachment of any covered structure to the primary residential building, such as an accessory building, covered deck or porch..

For example: a pergola, shed or carport that is attached to a house, a front or rear attached garage. If you are building a pergola on a deck a development permit application that allows the Town to review a development, in accordance with relevant bylaws and policies, and includes the plans and conditions of approval needs to be applied for.

If you are building a structure for the purpose of developing a backyard suite, these are commonly referred to as carriage houses, garage suites, garden suites, or lane-way homes you are required to apply for both a development permit as well as a building permit and the associated residential energy code form.

Permits to Apply For

Building a new garage: applications for both a Development Permit and a Building Permit need to be applied for. If the garage is heated, it will need to have the residential energy code form as well.

Building a shed: sheds with a floor area under 10 square meters (107.6 square feet) do not require permits. If it is larger than 10 square meters, the shed requires both a development and building permit applications must be submitted.

Forms to help you get your building permit are: the Garage Details and  Accessory Building

Other Applications

 

Other Types of Applicaitons For what Projects

Application for Appeal

Appealing a development decision

Request for Extension Form

Requesting an extension for development permit or subdivision application
Request for Amendment Form When you need to rezone a parcel of land

 

Certificates and Letters

Compliance Certificates – is a document signed by the Town certifying that a development (e.g. house, shed, fence, garage) complies with the Land Use Bylaw with respect to yard requirements – it is properly located on the site, does not exceed lot coverage or building height requirements, etc. Compliance certificates are typically required by the mortgage company to protect the property residential industry each time a property changes hands in Taber.

Looking to have a compliance certificate done?

Zoning Letter – is a document signed by the Town outlining the parcel's permitted and discretionary uses as outlined in the Land Use Bylaw.

Comfort Letter – is a document signed by the Town identifying if the owner of the said property is responsible or liable for a caveat registered on the property.

The Inspections

New homes / new commercial and industrial buildings require a minimum of three building inspections:

  • Footing and foundation
  • Completion of wall, electrical, insulation, vapor barrier,
  • Occupancy inspection

Decks / garages require only one inspection. The Town of Taber contracts out the inspection and required permitting of plumbing, gas, and electrical work.

Call Superior Safety Codes Inc. at 403-320-0734 for all building inspections.

Call the Town of Taber Fire Department to schedule a Fire Inspection at 403-223-6010.

Servicing
Need to service your lot step-by-step chart

 Call Before You Dig

Always call Alberta One Call before you dig: 1-800-242-3447. For more information or to submit a locate request, visit Alberta One-Call.

Disclaimer: This information has no legal status and cannot be used as an official interpretation of the various bylaws, codes and regulations currently in effect. The Town of Taber accepts no responsibility to persons relying solely on this information. Web pages are updated periodically.